Our Ambassadors

Without the support of our wonderful ambassadors the message just would not get out.

Chloe Esposito – our Run2Cure 2018 Superstar Ambassador

Chloe Esposito

Chloe Esposito, Gold Medallist in the Modern Pentathlon at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, will continue to support  Run2Cure in 2018!

Chloe will be helping Neuroblastoma Australia to create more awareness about the rare children’s cancer, Neuroblastoma, and Run2Cure – as well as encouraging businesses and schools to get involved and show their support.  She also aims to raise $5,000 for research via her own fundraising page.

Chloe says: “I am really inspired to support the families affected by this awful disease by helping create as much awareness and raising as much money as I possibly can for research into neuroblastoma.  I hope people will join me in making this year’s Run2Cure the most successful yet!”

Peter Overton

Peter Overton is one of Australia’s most respected news journalists, working as chief newsreader for Sydney’s Nine News and special reporter for 60 Minutes. He met Sienna Hoffmann at Sydney Children’s Hospital during filming of a 60 Minutes episode and has supported Run2Cure since its inception, helping us raise awareness of neuroblastoma so we can boost research funding in this area.

Our Little Heroes Ambassador – Pinky McKay, Baby and Toddler expert.

Pinky McKay

“Neuroblastoma awareness is a cause close to my heart. I work with new parents and feel so privileged to share this precious time which should be exciting and happy and full of dreams for the future. I can’t even begin to imagine the heartbreak of knowing your baby or toddler has such a serious life threatening disease – and there is nothing you can do except hope and pray. When my own first baby was admitted to hospital with an acute illness, I waited for doctors to explain what was happening and a nurse flippantly commented, “the Dr will come and tell you about your baby’s tumour.” For a couple of hours as we waited, I felt so sick and worried but it turned out that ‘throwaway line’ was about another baby, not ours. I will never forget my feelings when I realised it meant that another family was going to get that devastating news. Having lost a baby nephew, I know how this affects the entire family – parents, siblings, grandparents. For parents, it’s not only the news that your baby could die but the anguish of seeing somebody so small and innocent having painful treatment and hoping with all your being that it will work to heal your baby. We desperately need research to understand why this cruel cancer happens to tiny babies and toddlers and we need a cure. We have seen how research has made a huge difference to survival rates with leukaemia, which now has a survival rate of over 90%. We can do this with neuroblastoma too!”